What questions should I ask my breast cancer oncologist?

What questions should you ask an oncologist?

7 Key Questions to Ask Your Oncologist

  • Where and when do you recommend getting a second opinion? …
  • What can I do to preserve my fertility? …
  • Is a clinical trial right for me? …
  • What should I do if I’m simply having trouble coming to grips with my diagnosis? …
  • What is the goal of my treatment? …
  • What will my treatment cost?

What questions should I ask my radiation oncologist for breast cancer?

10 Questions to Ask the Radiation Oncologist

  • What is the goal of radiation therapy?
  • Does radiation affect fertility?
  • What are the risks and side effects of radiation therapy?
  • Where do I go for radiation therapy?
  • How long does each session last?
  • How many weeks does treatment last?

What questions should I ask my oncologist on my first visit?

Here’s what to ask during your first cancer-related visit with your oncologist:

  • What is the purpose of this appointment?
  • Which type of cancer do I have?
  • What are the standard treatments for my condition?
  • Why do you recommend this particular treatment?
  • What are potential hazards and side effects?
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What questions should I ask my oncologist before chemo?

Questions to Ask About Chemotherapy

  • Which chemo drugs will I be given?
  • How will the drugs be given to me?
  • How often will I need to get chemo?
  • How long will my treatments last?
  • Where will I get chemo?
  • What’s the goal of chemo for my cancer?
  • What are the chances that the chemo will work?

Why would I be referred to an oncologist?

Takeaway. You will likely be referred to an oncologist if your doctor suspects that you have the disease. Your primary care physician may carry out tests to determine if you might have cancer. If there are any signs of cancer, your doctor may recommend visiting an oncologist as soon as possible.

What happens at your first oncology appointment?

When a patient comes in for the first consultation, the oncologist will conduct a thorough examination. The oncologist will ask questions and review the patient’s health history. This will include an assessment of the scans and tests the person may have had beforehand.

How long do you see an oncologist after breast cancer?

After you finish treatment for breast cancer, you’ll see your oncologist and other members of your health care team on a regular basis, usually about every 6 months for the first few years. After that, you’ll see them every year for many years.

What can I expect at my breast cancer consultation?

The surgeon will meet with you and discuss your concerns, medical history, breast history, and family history. Then the doctor will step out ask you to change into a gown for the breast exam. The breast exam may or may not include an ultrasound of the breast at that time.

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Does a lumpectomy mean you have cancer?

A lumpectomy is the surgical removal of a cancerous or noncancerous breast tumor. A lumpectomy also includes removing a small amount of normal breast tissue around a cancerous tumor. Other names for breast lumpectomy include partial mastectomy, breast-conserving surgery, breast-sparing surgery, and wide excision.

How do I prepare for an oncology appointment?

At the appointment, ask this:

  1. What kind of cancer do I have? …
  2. What stage is it? …
  3. Do I have to undergo any further diagnostic tests before we can begin treatment?
  4. Should I see a specialist? …
  5. What are my treatment options?
  6. Which treatment or combination of treatments would you recommend and why?

How long do oncology appointments last?

Treatment lengths vary from patient to patient. Some treatments may last 30 minutes, while others may last as long as eight hours.

How long should I wait to see an oncologist?

no more than 2 months (62 days) wait between the date the hospital receives an urgent referral for suspected cancer and the start of treatment. no more than 31 days wait between the meeting at which you and your doctor agree the treatment plan and the start of treatment.