What is the difference between a tumor suppressor protein and an oncogene?

What is a tumor suppressor protein?

A type of gene that makes a protein called a tumor suppressor protein that helps control cell growth. Mutations (changes in DNA) in tumor suppressor genes may lead to cancer. Also called antioncogene.

Is a tumor suppressor gene A protein?

p53 is a tumor suppressor protein that mediates cell growth and death, as well as modulates expression of several proteins that control the cell cycle.

How do oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes work together?

In contrast to the cellular proliferation-stimulating function of proto-oncogenes and oncogenes that drive the cell cycle forward, tumor suppressor genes code for proteins that normally operate to restrict cellular growth and division or even promote programmed cell death (apoptosis).

Which is an example of a tumor suppressor protein?

Well-described examples of tumor suppressor proteins include RB, p53, APC and CDKN2A/p14 ARF.

How does p53 work as a tumor suppressor?

The TP53 gene provides instructions for making a protein called tumor protein p53 (or p53). This protein acts as a tumor suppressor, which means that it regulates cell division by keeping cells from growing and dividing (proliferating) too fast or in an uncontrolled way.

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What happens if a tumor suppressor gene mutates?

When a proto-oncogene mutates (changes) or there are too many copies of it, it becomes a “bad” gene that can become permanently turned on or activated when it is not supposed to be. When this happens, the cell grows out of control, which can lead to cancer.

What is an example of a tumor suppressor gene?

Examples of tumor suppressor genes are the BRCA1/BRCA2 genes, otherwise known as the “breast cancer genes.” People who have a mutation in one of these genes have an increased risk of developing breast cancer (among other cancers). However, not everyone with the gene develops breast cancer.

What is the most common tumor suppressor gene?

The nuclear phosphoprotein gene TP53 has also been recognized as an important tumor suppressor gene, perhaps the most commonly altered gene in all human cancers. Inactivating mutations of the TP53 gene also cause the TP53 protein to lose its ability to regulate the cell cycle.

Is p53 a tumor suppressor gene?

The p53 gene is a type of tumor suppressor gene. Also called TP53 gene and tumor protein p53 gene.

How do you identify tumor suppressor genes?

Classic tumor suppressor genes are defined by mutation in both familial and sporadic forms of cancer. An increasing number of candidate tumor suppressor genes are identified by somatic mutations and have not been associated with genetic predisposition.