What disease increases risk for cervical cancer?

Which disease is responsible for causing the most cases of cervical cancer?

Almost all cervical cancer is caused by HPV. Some cancers of the vulva, vagina, penis, anus, and oropharynx (back of the throat, including the base of the tongue and tonsils) are also caused by HPV. Almost all cervical cancer is caused by HPV.

Can cervical cancer be cured completely?

Cervical cancer is generally viewed as treatable and curable, particularly if it is diagnosed when the cancer is in an early stage. This disease occurs in the cervix, or the passageway that joins the lower section of the uterus to the vagina.

What happens to your body when you have cervical cancer?

What Is Cervical Cancer? Cervical cancer happens when cells change in women’s cervix, which connects thier uterus with vagina. This cancer can affect the deeper tissues of their cervix and may spread to other parts of their body (metastasize), often the lungs, liver, bladder, vagina, and rectum.

What is the most common age to get cervical cancer?

Cervical cancer is most frequently diagnosed in women between the ages of 35 and 44 with the average age at diagnosis being 50 . It rarely develops in women younger than 20.

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How do you beat cervical cancer?

If You Have Cervical Cancer

  1. The cervix. The cervix is the lower part of the uterus. …
  2. Cryosurgery. This treatment kills the cancer cells by freezing them. …
  3. Laser surgery. This treatment uses a laser to burn off cancer cells. …
  4. Conization. Conization is also called a cone biopsy. …
  5. Hysterectomy.

What were your first signs of cervical cancer?

Cervical Cancer: Symptoms and Signs

  • Blood spots or light bleeding between or following periods.
  • Menstrual bleeding that is longer and heavier than usual.
  • Bleeding after intercourse, douching, or a pelvic examination.
  • Increased vaginal discharge.
  • Pain during sexual intercourse.
  • Bleeding after menopause.